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HMT Queen Mary

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HMT Queen Mary
RMS Queen Mary.jpg
Queen Mary in her resting place at Long Beach California
RMS Queen Mary 1.jpg
Queen Mary during fit out
History
Name HMT Queen Mary
Owner Cunard, White Star Line
Builder 1936 John Brown & Company, Clydebank, Scotland
Yard number 534
Launched 26 Sep 1934
Completed March 1936
In service 1936
Out of service 1967
Fate Museum ship
General characteristics
Type Passenger Liner
Tonnage 81,237 tons
Length 1,019'6" (310.74m)
Beam 118' (35.97m)
Depth 38'10" (11.83m)
Propulsion 4 x turbines
Speed 28.5 knots
Capacity 10,595 troops


Remarks

The RMS Queen Mary is a retired British ocean liner that sailed primarily on the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line – known as Cunard-White Star Line. Along with RMS Queen Elizabeth she was to provide a weekly express service between Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. H=er keel was laid on 27 Dec 1930


With the outbreak of the Second World War, she wasrequisitioned by the Ministry ofShipping on 1 Mar 1940, and converted into a troopship to ferry Allied soldiers during the war. On 2 October 1942, Queen Mary accidentally sank one of her escort ships, slicing through the light cruiser HMS Curacoa off the Irish coast with a loss of 239 lives. Queen Mary was carrying thousands of Americans of the 29th Infantry Division to join the Allied forces in Europe.


She resume commercial service during July 1947 before leaving Southampton for the last time on 31 October 1967 and sailed to the port of Long Beach, California, United States, where she remains permanently moored serving as a tourist attraction featuring restaurants, a museum and a hotel.


Soldiers carried

Cape Town to England 30 May - 17 Jun 1940


Fremantle to Bombay 25 October - 7 November 1940

2/16th Battalion


Fremantle to Middle East 9 - 23 September 1941

Boarded 6th, sailed 9th September

Fremantle to Port Tewfik, Egypt 7 - 22 November 1941

Suez to Fremantle via Massawa & Maldive Islands 24 January - 18 February 1943